PDA

View Full Version : Religious Education as a Part of Literary Culture



nickel
13-04-2009, 03:55 AM
Αντιγράφω εδώ ένα τετρασέλιδο από το βιβλίο του Ρίτσαρντ Ντόκινς The God Delusion επειδή σκοπεύω να το αξιοποιήσω κατά τρεις τουλάχιστον τρόπους. Ανήκει στο κεφάλαιο Childhood, Abuse and Religion (σελ. 340-344). Κοκκινίζω τα κομμάτια που με ενδιαφέρουν περισσότερο.



Religious Education as a Part of Literary Culture

I must admit that even I am a little taken aback at the biblical ignorance commonly displayed by people educated in more recent decades than I was. Or maybe it isn’t a decade thing. As long ago as 1954, according to Robert Hinde in his thoughtful book Why Gods Persist, a Gallup poll in the United States of America found the following. Three-quarters of Catholics and Protestants could not name a single Old Testament prophet. More than two-thirds didn’t know who preached the Sermon on the Mount. A substantial number thought that Moses was one of Jesus’s twelve apostles. That, to repeat, was in the United States, which is dramatically more religious than other parts of the developed world.

The King James Bible of 1611 —the Authorized Version— includes passages of outstanding literary merit in its own right, for example the Song of Songs, and the sublime Ecclesiastes (which I am told is pretty good in the original Hebrew too). But the main reason the English Bible needs to be part of our education is that it is a major source book for literary culture. The same applies to the legends of the Greek and Roman gods, and we learn about them without being asked to believe in them.

nickel
13-04-2009, 03:57 AM
Here is a quick list of biblical, or Bible-inspired, phrases and sentences that occur commonly in literary or conversational English, from great poetry to hackneyed cliche, from proverb to gossip.


Be fruitful and multiply
East of Eden
Adam’s Rib
Am I my brother’s keeper?
The mark of Cain
As old as Methuselah
A mess of potage
Sold his birthright
Jacob’s ladder
Coat of many colours
Amid the alien corn
Eyeless in Gaza
The fat of the land
The fatted calf
Stranger in a strange land
Burning bush
A land flowing with milk and honey
Let my people go
Flesh pots
An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth
Be sure your sin will find you out
The apple of his eye
The stars in their courses
Butter in a lordly dish
The hosts of Midian
Shibboleth
Out of the strong came forth sweetness
He smote them hip and thigh
Philistine
A man after his own heart
Like David and Jonathan
Passing the love of women
How are the mighty fallen?
Ewe lamb
Man of Belial
Jezebel
Queen of Sheba
Wisdom of Solomon
The half was not told me
Girded up his loins
Drew a bow at a venture
Job’s comforters
The patience of Job
I am escaped with the skin of my teeth
The price of wisdom is above rubies
Leviathan
Go to the ant thou sluggard; consider her ways, and be wise
Spare the rod and spoil the child
A word in season
Vanity of vanities
To everything there is a season, and a time to every purpose
The race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong
Of making many books there is no end
I am the rose of Sharon
A garden inclosed
The little foxes
Many waters cannot quench love
Beat their swords into plowshares
Grind the faces of the poor
The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid
Let us eat and drink; for tomorrow we shall die
Set thine house in order
A voice crying in the wilderness
No peace for the wicked
See eye to eye
Cut off out of the land of the living
Balm in Gilead
Can the leopard change his spots?
The parting of the ways
A Daniel in the lions’ den
They have sown the wind, and they shall reap the whirlwind
Sodom and Gomorrah
Man shall not live by bread alone
Get thee behind me Satan
The salt of the earth
Hide your light under a bushel
Turn the other cheek
Go the extra mile
Moth and rust doth corrupt
Cast your pearls before swine
Wolf in sheep’s clothing
Weeping and gnashing of teeth
Gadarene swine
New wine in old bottles
Shake off the dust of your feet
He that is not with me is against me
Judgement of Solomon
Fell upon stony ground
A prophet is not without honour, save in his own country
The crumbs from the table
Sign of the times
Den of thieves
Pharisee
Whited sepulchre
Wars and rumours of wars
Good and faithful servant
Separate the sheep from the goats
I wash my hands of it
The sabbath was made for man, and not man for the sabbath
Suffer the little children
The widow’s mite
Physician heal thyself
Good Samaritan
Passed by on the other side
Grapes of wrath
Lost sheep
Prodigal son
A great gulf fixed
Whose shoe latchet I am not worthy to unloose
Cast the first stone
Jesus wept
Greater love hath no man than this
Doubting Thomas
Road to Damascus
A law unto himself
Through a glass darkly
Death, where is thy sting?
A thorn in the flesh
Fallen from grace
Filthy lucre
The root of all evil
Fight the good fight
All flesh is as grass
The weaker vessel
I am Alpha and Omega
Armageddon
De profundis
Quo vadis
Rain on the just and on the unjust

nickel
13-04-2009, 04:02 AM
Every one of these idioms, phrases or cliches comes directly from the King James Authorized Version of the Bible. Surely ignorance of the Bible is bound to impoverish one’s appreciation of English literature? And not just solemn and serious literature. The following rhyme by Lord Justice Bowen is ingeniously witty:

The rain it raineth on the just,
And also on the unjust fella.
But chiefly on the just, because
The unjust hath the just’s umbrella.
But the enjoyment is muffled if you can’t take the allusion to Matthew 5:45 (‘For he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust’). And the fine point of Eliza Dolittle’s fantasy in My Fair Lady would escape anybody ignorant of John the Baptist’s end:

‘Thanks a lot, King,’ says I in a manner well bred, ‘But all I want is ’Enry ’Iggins’ ’ead.’

P. G. Wodehouse is, for my money, the greatest writer of light comedy in English, and I bet fully half my list of biblical phrases will be found as allusions within his pages. (A Google search will not find all of them, however. It will miss the derivation of the short-story title ‘The Aunt and the Sluggard’, from Proverbs 6:6.) The Wodehouse canon is rich in other biblical phrases, not in my list above and not incorporated into the language as idioms or proverbs. Listen to Bertie Wooster’s evocation of what it is like to wake up with a bad hangover: ‘I had been dreaming that some bounder was driving spikes through my head — not just ordinary spikes, as used by Jael the wife of Heber, but red-hot ones.’ Bertie himself was immensely proud of his only scholastic achievement, the prize he once earned for scripture knowledge.

What is true of comic writing in English is more obviously true of serious literature. Naseeb Shaheen’s tally of more than thirteen hundred biblical references in Shakespeare’s works is widely cited and very believable. The Bible Literacy Report published in Fairfax, Virginia (admittedly financed by the infamous Templeton Foundation) provides many examples, and cites overwhelming agreement by teachers of English literature that biblical literacy is essential to full appreciation of their subject. Doubtless the equivalent is true of French, German, Russian, Italian, Spanish and other great European literatures. And, for speakers of Arabic and Indian languages, knowledge of the Qur’an or the Bhagavad Gita is presumably just as essential for full appreciation of their literary heritage. Finally, to round off the list, you can’t appreciate Wagner (whose music, as has been wittily said, is better than it sounds) without knowing your way around the Norse gods.

Let me not labour the point. I have probably said enough to convince at least my older readers that an atheistic world-view provides no justification for cutting the Bible, and other sacred books, out of our education. And of course we can retain a sentimental loyalty to the cultural and literary traditions of, say, Judaism, Anglicanism or Islam, and even participate in religious rituals such as marriages and funerals, without buying into the supernatural beliefs that historically went along with those traditions. We can give up belief in God while not losing touch with a treasured heritage.

agezerlis
13-04-2009, 06:01 AM
Παρεμφερές λινκ (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/4678369/Poet-Laureate-Andrew-Motion-calls-for-all-children-to-be-taught-the-Bible.html).

jmanveda
13-04-2009, 11:10 AM
Fascinating! The great current champion of atheism and his views on the imperative necessity of reversing cultural impoverishment -- before it is too late...

The link to Andrew Moion, who seconds this, is good too.

Hear, hear.

Self-styled nihilistic progressives aside, will anyone amongst the decision-makers listen???

nickel
13-04-2009, 01:59 PM
Η συζήτηση είναι μεγάλη και, για όσους δεν περνάνε τώρα από τα θρανία ή δεν έχουν παιδιά που περνάνε, ίσως αδιάφορη. Εγώ πάντως σας έχω κι άλλα σχετικά κουφετάκια για αργότερα. Τα δικά μου ερωτήματα είναι δύο: (α) υπάρχει πραγματικό ενδιαφέρον της κοινωνίας για μια «φιλολογική» ή «γλωσσολογική» προσέγγιση στη Βίβλο; Τι συμπεράσματα θα βγάζαμε από μια μέτρηση σαν κι εκείνη στην Αμερική που διαπίστωσε ότι «More than two-thirds didn’t know who preached the Sermon on the Mount»; Θα είχαμε καλύτερα (φιλολογικά και γλωσσολογικά) αποτελέσματα αν αφαιρούσαμε το ασφυκτικό θρησκευτικό πλαίσιο; (β) Ποιος είναι ο καλύτερος τρόπος να διδαχτεί αυτή η γραμματεία, αυτή η παράδοση, για να γίνει απολαυστική και χρήσιμη; Ακόμα δεν το κατάφεραν με τα νέα και τα αρχαία ελληνικά εδώ.

Ambrose
13-04-2009, 02:22 PM
Νομίζω ότι τα πράγματα είναι πολύ απλά: αν σε ενδιαφέρει κάτι και το αγαπάς, θα το ψάξεις, θα το μελετήσεις, θα το αγαπήσεις. Όποιος θέλει να βρει, βρίσκει, ειδικά σήμερα. Υπάρχει και αυτό που λέγεται inspirational teaching (http://www.google.gr/search?hl=el&q=%22inspirational+teaching&btnG=%CE%91%CE%BD%CE%B1%CE%B6%CE%AE%CF%84%CE%B7%CF%83%CE%B7&meta=). Για να γίνει όμως, αυτός που διδάσκει πρέπει να αγαπάει πολύ αυτό που διδάσκει. Γιατί αλλιώς τα αποτελέσματα θα είναι να κάνει τους μαθητές του να το μισήσουν. Πόσοι από όσους διδάχτηκαν στο σχολείο αρχαία ελληνική γραμματεία, την αγάπησαν ή έστω την εκτίμησαν; Γι' αυτό φταίει η γραμματεία ή η διδασκαλία;

Υ.Γ. Ο μόνος τρόπος (και λογικό) είναι να γίνει η αρχαία ελληνική γραμματεία επίκαιρη. Δηλαδή, relevant με το σήμερα. Και πρακτική. Όχι ένα απομακρυσμένο, νεφελώδες ιδεώδες. Αλλά για να γίνει αυτό, αυτός που την διδάσκει, όπως είπα και πριν, πρέπει να την αγαπάει, άρα να την έχει ψάξει.

Elsa
13-04-2009, 02:27 PM
Η συζήτηση είναι μεγάλη και, για όσους δεν περνάνε τώρα από τα θρανία ή δεν έχουν παιδιά που περνάνε, ίσως αδιάφορη. Εγώ πάντως σας έχω κι άλλα σχετικά κουφετάκια για αργότερα. Τα δικά μου ερωτήματα είναι δύο: (α) υπάρχει πραγματικό ενδιαφέρον της κοινωνίας για μια «φιλολογική» ή «γλωσσολογική» προσέγγιση στη Βίβλο; Τι συμπεράσματα θα βγάζαμε από μια μέτρηση σαν κι εκείνη στην Αμερική που διαπίστωσε ότι «More than two-thirds didn’t know who preached the Sermon on the Mount»; Θα είχαμε καλύτερα (φιλολογικά και γλωσσολογικά) αποτελέσματα αν αφαιρούσαμε το ασφυκτικό θρησκευτικό πλαίσιο; (β) Ποιος είναι ο καλύτερος τρόπος να διδαχτεί αυτή η γραμματεία, αυτή η παράδοση, για να γίνει απολαυστική και χρήσιμη; Ακόμα δεν το κατάφεραν με τα νέα και τα αρχαία ελληνικά εδώ.

Πάρα πολύ ενδιαφέροντα όλα όσα θέτεις, όμως δεν έχω χρόνο, μάτια μου, που λέει και το άσμα, μετά το Πάσχα θα επανέλθω! :)

SBE
13-04-2009, 04:07 PM
Η ΠΔ είναι ατέλειωτη και οι ΧΟ δε νομίζω να έχουν το ίδιο ψώνιο με αυτή όπως οι άλλοι χριστιανοί- ειδικά οι προτεστάντες. Ορισμένες φράσεις τις μαθαίνεις τυποποιημένα, τώρα άμα δεν πιάσεις κάτι στη λογοτεχνία, ε, γι' αυτό υπάρχουν κι οι αναλύσεις. Πόσες φορές έχουμε δει πίνακες ζωγραφικής με βιβλικά ή μυθολογικά θέματα και η επεξήγηση ήταν διαφωτιστική; Αλλά δε νομίζω ότι μειώθηκε η απόλαυση του θεάματος. Φυσικά ένας αρχαιολόγος ξέρει τη μυθολογία καλύτερα από εμένα που ξέρω μόνο τους δέκα άθλους του Ηρακλή που έμαθα στην Τρίτη δημοτικού (μετά ανακάλυψα τους δύο ακατάλληλους δι' ανηλίκους).

Πολλές φορές έχω αναρωτηθεί τί καταλαβαίνουν από τις άπειρες αναφορές του Αγγελόπουλου στην ελληνική ιστορία οι αλλοδαποί θεατές (και κριτικοί και όλοι οι άλλοι). Θυμάμαι που τον ρώταγαν οι δημοσιογράφοι αν ο Σολωμός είναι υπαρκτό πρόσωπο, όπως ρώταγαν και τον Ουμπέρτο Έκο αν είναι υπαρκτός ο Νικήτας Χωνιάτης.

Costas
14-04-2009, 12:46 PM
Ενδιαφέρον νομίζω θα υπήρχε, αν αυτά διδάσκονταν σαν ιστορίες, σαν παραμύθια, αλλά πολύ μικρότερο απ' ό,τι για την ελληνική μυθολογία. Πάντως, όπως είπε ο/η SBE, οι ΧΟ μικρή σχέση έχουν με την Παλαιά Διαθήκη (ούτε και οι Καθολικοί, άλλωστε), η δε ανάγνωση/μελέτη της ΠΔ δεν συνιστάται (παλιά μάλιστα απαγορευόταν) χωρίς παράλληλη ερμηνεία τους από τους Χριστιανούς Πατέρες και χωρίς τη βοήθεια του Πνευματικού. Ούτε υπάρχουν πολλά παλαιοδιαθηκικά θέματα στη βυζαντινή, τουλάχιστον, τέχνη. Κυρίως:

Τα πορτρέτα των προφητών (στη βάση του τρούλου, ανάμεσα στα παράθυρά του)
Οι 3 παίδες εν καμίνω
Ο Δανιήλ στο λάκκο των λεόντων
Η φιλοξενία Αβραάμ
Η Γένεση
Η σκηνή του μαρτυρίου και η κιβωτός της διαθήκης (π.χ. Μονή Καισαριανής)
Το όραμα του Αββακούμ (Όσιος Δαβίδ Θεσ/κης)
Η συνομιλία Ιησού του Ναυή και αρχαγγέλου Μιχαήλ (Όσ. Λουκάς)
Ο Μωυσής και η φλεγόμενη βάτος (εικόνα στη Μ. Αγ. Αικατερίνης στο Σινά -λογικό!)
Ο Προφήτης Ηλίας

Δεν είναι και πολλά (εντάξει, σίγουρα κάτι θα ξεχνάω).

Στην χριστιανική υμνογραφία, τα πράγματα είναι διαφορετικά. Εκεί επανέρχεται συνεχώς, π.χ., η διάβαση της Ερυθράς Θάλασσας. Αλλά ποιος διαβάζει υμνογραφία σήμερα; Μολονότι είναι υπέροχη. Και φυσικά, οι ακολουθίες είναι αδιανόητες χωρίς τους Ψαλμούς.

Εν κατακλείδι, η όποια διδασκαλία της Βίβλου για λόγους "γενικής κουλτούρας" έχει νόημα μόνο στα πλαίσια του μαθήματος "Ιστορία της Δυτικής Τέχνης", άντε και της Λογοτεχνίας, δηλ. σε μαθήματα αρκετά εξειδικευμένα. Κατά τα άλλα, δεν μπορείς να διαχωρίσεις τη μορφή (τις παροιμιώδες φράσεις κλπ.) από το περιεχόμενο (τη θρησκεία).

Zazula
14-04-2009, 01:04 PM
Ούτε υπάρχουν πολλά παλαιοδιαθηκικά θέματα στη βυζαντινή, τουλάχιστον, τέχνη. Κυρίως:
[...]
Η φιλοξενία Αβραάμ
[...]
Η φιλοξενία Αβραάμ υπάρχει κυρίως επειδή συνιστά τη μόνη ορθή (με ορθόδοξα κριτήρια) απεικόνιση της Αγίας Τριάδας. Γι' αυτό συχνά παραλείπονται ο Αβραάμ και η Σάρρα.

Costas
14-04-2009, 01:26 PM
Και κάτι άλλο. Αυτή η έκφραση, Religious Education, μου φαίνεται υπερβολική, και προσβλητική. Δηλαδή, η διδασκαλία μερικών ιστοριών συνιστά "θρησκευτική παιδεία"; Η θρησκευτική παιδεία σημαίνει θεολογική, πρωτίστως, μύηση, και κατά δεύτερο λόγο διδασκαλία της ηθικής. Τριτευόντως, μόνο, ιερά ιστορία. Δηλαδή, κάποιος που γνωρίζει απέξω κι ανακατωτά τα θέματα και τις ιστορίες της Βίβλου (ή του Κορανιού ή της Μπαγκαβάτ Γκιτά ή...), είναι "θρησκευτικά πεπαιδευμένος"; Όχι δα!

nickel
14-04-2009, 02:20 PM
Δεν κατάλαβα σε ποιο περιβάλλον σε ενοχλεί το Religious Education. Γιατί, εκτός από «θρησκευτική διαπαιδαγώγηση», είναι εδώ και χρόνια και ο όρος για τα Θρησκευτικά, το μάθημα, με βραχυγραφία R.E. (και έτσι, πιστεύω, χρησιμοποιείται στον τίτλο της ομιλίας).

Costas
14-04-2009, 02:26 PM
Στο περιβάλλον που το χρησιμοποιεί ο αγαπητότατός μου Ντώκινς. Είναι σα να του πω εγώ ότι "Science Education" είναι το να έχεις στην γκαρνταρόμπα σου ένα μπλουζάκι με το E = mc2 και ένα με τη φάτσα του Αϊστάιν με τη γλώσσα έξω. Η θρησκεία είναι θεολογία. Η εξοικείωση με την ιερή ιστορία δεν είναι θεολογία, άρα δεν είναι religious education. Απλώς επαναλαμβάνω τα όσα είπα πιο πάνω. Νομίζω πως είναι σαφή.

Costas
14-04-2009, 06:30 PM
Η φιλοξενία Αβραάμ υπάρχει κυρίως επειδή συνιστά τη μόνη ορθή (με ορθόδοξα κριτήρια) απεικόνιση της Αγίας Τριάδας. Γι' αυτό συχνά παραλείπονται ο Αβραάμ και η Σάρρα.
Έτσι κι αλλιώς, όλα τα ΠΔ θέματα μεθερμηνεύονται από το χριστιανισμό. Όλα είναι προτυπώσεις της Τριάδας, του Ιησού, του σταυρικού θανάτου του, της Παναγίας, κοκ.

Zazula
14-04-2009, 08:45 PM
Ναι, αλλά στις υπόλοιπες παραστάσεις από την ΠΔ έχεις προτύπωση ενός γεγονότος της ΚΔ το οποίο αγιογραφείται κανονικά — ενώ για την Αγία Τριάδα δεν έχεις άλλον τρόπο απεικόνισης (εννοείται ότι η παράσταση με το γέροντα Πατέρα, τον Ιησού Υιό και το περιστέρι Άγιο Πνεύμα, δεν θεωρείται θεολογικώς ορθή).

Costas
19-04-2009, 12:27 PM
Μερικά ακόμα θέματα από την ΠΔ στη μεταβυζαντινή θρησκευτική ζωγραφική (από τον Πανδέκτη Ελλήνων ζωγράφων μετά την Άλωση (http://pandektis.ekt.gr/dspace/handle/123456789/28901), του Εθνικού Κέντρου Τεκμηρίωσης):

Θυσία Αβραάμ, ιστορία Σωσάννας, ιστορία Ιωσήφ, ιστορία Ισμαηλιτών, Κιβωτός του Νώε, κλίμαξ Ιακώβ, σκηνές από το βίο του Μωυσή, Βαβέλ.

tsioutsiou
24-04-2009, 03:42 PM
Τι συμπεράσματα θα βγάζαμε από μια μέτρηση σαν κι εκείνη στην Αμερική που διαπίστωσε ότι «More than two-thirds didn’t know who preached the Sermon on the Mount»;
То ζήτημα είναι πόσο nature πόσο nurture; (jokes.pathfinder.gr/index.php?cat=20&joke=2699&offset=82&tot=20)

nickel
24-04-2009, 03:52 PM
Δεν έχω το χρόνο τώρα να γυρίσω σ' αυτό το νήμα, κι ας το θέλω πολύ, κι ας πήρα και ιδιωτικές προκλήσεις που ζητούν απάντηση. Προς το παρόν, θα λαϊκίσω πριν λακίσω.

Δείτε το Religulous (Πίστευε και ... γέλα) για χάχανα σχετικά με το θέμα. Εκεί είδα και το μουσείο με το οποίο ξεκινά το άρθρο της Guardian «Defying Darwin (http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2009/feb/17/evolution-versus-creationism-science)».

Zazula
26-04-2009, 12:11 PM
Μερικά ακόμα θέματα από την ΠΔ στη μεταβυζαντινή θρησκευτική ζωγραφική (από τον Πανδέκτη Ελλήνων ζωγράφων μετά την Άλωση (http://pandektis.ekt.gr/dspace/handle/123456789/28901), του Εθνικού Κέντρου Τεκμηρίωσης): Θυσία Αβραάμ [...]


Προς το παρόν, θα λαϊκίσω πριν λακίσω.

Πάντως η Θυσία Αβραάμ απολαύει (http://www.lexilogia.gr/forum/showthread.php?t=422) τιμών που ανέρχονται σε μερικές χιλιάδες (ευρώ), πράγμα που (εναρμονισμένος με το πνεύμα λαϊκισμού τού nickel) σπεύδω να αποδείξω καταθέτοντας και το δέον φωτογραφικό τεκμήριο (κοπιράιτ τού αδελφού μου, που εντόπισε και αποτύπωσε το στιγμιότυπο):

http://img524.imageshack.us/img524/5495/agiography.jpg