Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Areti Ketime lavishes praise on Mikis Theodorakis

  1. #1
    Senior Member Theseus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Gloucester UK
    Posts
    2,452
    Gender
    Male

    Areti Ketime lavishes praise on Mikis Theodorakis

    I'm getting a bit better at understanding many words but it's the general drift I don't get, as in the lead-up to these two songs in the interpretation by Areti Ketime:



    As and when someone can...

  2. #2
    Senior Member SBE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Londinium
    Posts
    10,785
    Gender
    Female
    The usual generalisations, cliches and self congratulations from both the presenter and the young artist.
    The presenter says that since you are the youngest here, we will listen to you carefully (and a few other words that convey zero additional meaning).
    The singer says that she is too young to be too familiar with all of the work of Theodorakis, that most of the children of her generation don't love Theodorakis, they adore him*. And because she comes from a folk music background (παραδοσιακή μουσική) she says that tradition (παράδοση) is whatever is passed on from one generation to the next and that for them (for her generation) the music of Theodorakis has been passed on from the previous generation, it is therefore tradition**.

    * we call that in Greek λιβάνισμα (flattery)
    ** yes, this is the kind of tripe that gets you high marks in composition in high school in Greece

  3. #3
    Senior Member Theseus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Gloucester UK
    Posts
    2,452
    Gender
    Male
    Thanks so much, SBE. I can now go over it again with more confidence.
    BTW, like you , I have had the dubious privilege of marking school homework and exams at all levels, sometimes work extensively indebted to google without the use of quotation marks. In so many cases the days are gone in which the mind was really exercised in an exam. I remember my Ancient History question on the Persian Wars: 'in what way did the weather affect the outcome of the Persian Wars'. Tough but I managed it: no computers then, no google and certainly no flattery of the turgid textbooks which were our diet!

  4. #4
    Senior Member Earion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Αθήνα, Εξάρχεια (Μουσείο)
    Posts
    5,709
    Gender
    Male
    Theseus, I suggest you concentrate on the first song that Areti Ketime sings. It’s a poem by the great Yannis Ritsos, from his collection titled «Δεκαοχτώ λιανοτράγουδα της πικρής πατρίδας», put to music by Theodorakis. (Λιανοτράγουδο means a short, easy composition with no pretence on high poetry). Imitating the style of traditional love songs (δίστιχα or τετράστιχα της αγάπης), Ritsos enriched the form with dense imagery and meaning, rising to high poetic ground, while keeping appearance that it’s a product of low-level skill («Τέτοια ποιήματα σου γράφουμε εκατό την ώρα»).

    Κουβέντα με ένα λουλούδι

    Κυκλάμινο, κυκλάμινο στου βράχου τη σχισμάδα
    πού βρήκες χρώματα κι ανθείς, πού μίσχο και σαλεύεις;

    «Μέσα στο βράχο σύναξα το γαίμα στάλα-στάλα,
    μαντήλι ρόδινο έπλεξα, κι ήλιο μαζεύω τώρα».

    Note: γαίμα : poetic form for αίμα. Also μαντήλι is old spelling for μαντίλι. You can find the whole collection here.
    Άλλο πληροφορία, άλλο γνώση· άλλο βία, άλλο δύναμη.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Theseus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Gloucester UK
    Posts
    2,452
    Gender
    Male
    My translation (some versions have κυκλαδικό, κυκλάμινο, which is clearly wrong, spoils the doublet & and there is then a clash of accentual stress):

    Conversation with a flower

    "Cyclamen, cyclamen in the crevice of the rock
    where did you find colours for flowering, and where a stem for swaying?"

    "Inside the rock I have gathered the lifeblood, drop by drop,
    I have woven a rose-red handkerchief and now I'm harvesting sunlight."

  6. #6
    Senior Member daeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    anywhere I lay my head
    Posts
    22,568
    Gender
    Male
    Quote Originally Posted by Earion View Post
    ...Also μαντήλι is old spelling for μαντίλι. You can find the whole collection here.
    And here:

    Quote Originally Posted by daeman View Post
    As for μαντήλι / μαντίλι, we've already unraveled a thread for that: μαντήλι ή μαντίλι — και άλλες απλοποιήσεις
    Θεωρητικά, θεωρία και πράξη είναι το ίδιο πράγμα. Στην πράξη, όμως, διαφέρουν.
    When this you see, remember me and bear me in your mind, let all the world say what they may, speak of me as you find.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Theseus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Gloucester UK
    Posts
    2,452
    Gender
    Male
    Thanks, 'Man for the very useful link. Etymologically, the word from which μαντίλι is derived has several different forms: mantēle (mantīle), is, n., and mantēlĭum (mantīlĭum), ii, n. manus and tēla, properly a cloth for the hand, a towel, napkin.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Theseus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Gloucester UK
    Posts
    2,452
    Gender
    Male
    Please emend the last line to: I have gathered the lifeblood, drop by drop....

  9. #9
    Senior Member daeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    anywhere I lay my head
    Posts
    22,568
    Gender
    Male
    Fixed. Έγινε.
    Θεωρητικά, θεωρία και πράξη είναι το ίδιο πράγμα. Στην πράξη, όμως, διαφέρουν.
    When this you see, remember me and bear me in your mind, let all the world say what they may, speak of me as you find.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Theseus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Gloucester UK
    Posts
    2,452
    Gender
    Male
    Αυγή

    Στίχοι: Γιάννης Ρίτσος

    Λιόχαρη μεγαλόχαρη
    της άνοιξης αυγούλα
    και που ’χει μάτια να σε ιδεί
    να σε καλωσορίσει

    Δυο κάρβουνα στο θυμιατό
    και δυο κουκιά λιβάνι
    κι ένας σταυρός από καπνιά
    στ’ ανώφλι της πατρίδας



    Sun-filled, full of grace,
    Spring Sunrise
    and where are the eyes to see you
    to welcome you?

    Two coals into the thurible
    and two grains of incense
    and a cross of lampblack
    on the lintel of the homeland.

    [I know the custom referred to here, so kind fellows your help here (for once!) is not needed.]

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •